PROFESSIONAL MOTORSPORT

SIMULATION SOFTWARE

Finding the optimum for a certain setup configuration

Select 1 to 3 different vehicle setup

LapSim has the possibility programmed to run a scalable amount of setup variations, based on 1 to 3 setup's you specify.

By clicking on the pushbutton you can select the setup's. They need to be LapSim setup files.

Example of 3-D plot of LapTime versus ARB stiffness distribution and weight balance

LapSim will make 7 x 7 = 49 setup variation runs per setup. This leads to a graph as shown on the right side.

On the x-axis and y-axis are the variables of the setup. The z-axis shows the laptime. The graph therefor shows you if the original setup is (close to) optimal, laptime wise.

Select one the simulated points with the help of the GUI

You can subsequently click in the figure to analyse the individual results. The individual runs are not saved, because it would consume a lot of disk space.

If you want to analyse one or more individual runs more closely, you can simply let LapSim re-calculate them by pushing the button "Simulate selected run"

Helpful for a vehicle without a 3D aeromap

Variation option weightbalance versus rear rideheight

If a LapSim setup does not have a 3D aeromap, the variation menu will enable a variation run of ARB stiffness distribution versus weight balance.

LapSim offers the option to change the weight distribution into rear rideheight but this only makes sense if there is a 3D aeromap.

Example of setup variation results, LapTime versus ARB stiffness distribution and weight balance

For one set-up the variation run consist of 7 x 7 = 49 runs as can be seen in the figure on the right.

Experience has shown, that with a change of the setup, one also needs to adjust the brake balance, to get the fastest laptime.

Within LapSim there is the 'optimisation' routine for the brake balance, which is used.

Example of setup variation results, Brake balance versus ARB stiffness distribution and weight balance

To improve accuracy, LapSim always makes a second simulation run with the 'advised' brake balance.

It subsequently chooses the fastest of the two runs. The resulting brake balance for each setup can be seen in results, as shown in the third figure.

Optimal preparation for a race weekend

Variation option in case of 4-D Aeromap: weightbalance for 4 rear ride heights versus rear rideheight for 4 rear wing positions

In case you have a 4D aeromap in the setup of your vehicle, LapSim can extend variation runs for several wing positions.

This is a great help in the preparation for a race weekend. It will give you a clear direction of the wing position with corresponding rideheight settings.

Alternatively you can let LapSim vary the weight balance for 4 different rear rideheights.

Example of LapTime versus ARB stiffness and rear rideheight for lowest rear wing position

Wing angle -1 degree

In the figures you see an example of a simulation run for 4 wing positions.

The top figure is with the rear wing at -1 degree angle. Subsequent figures are the results for 3, 7 and 11 degrees rear wing angle.

Example of LapTime versus ARB stiffness and rear rideheight for second rear wing position

Wing angle 3 degrees

Out of the shape of the figures it can clearly be seen that with increasing wing angle, the rear rideheight needs to raise to get to the fastest laptime.

Furthermore, the changing shape indicates that the model favours more rollstiffness at the rear with increasing wing angle.

Example of LapTime versus ARB stiffness and rear rideheight for third rear wing position

Wing angle 7 degrees

In this case, the fastest laptime was achieved with -1 degree rear wing, closely followed by the fastest laptime with 3 degrees of rear wing.

Apart from the fastest laptime, an analysis like this gives a clear view of how sensitive the laptime is to variations of the setup.

Example of LapTime versus ARB stiffness and rear rideheight for highest rear wing position

Wing angle 11 degrees

In the real world, laptime is strongly influenced by driver confidence. An aspect which does not play a role with the simulation model.

If the analysis learns you that 3 degrees of rear wing instead of -1, is only 0.05 [sec] of (theoretical) laptime, you know that in reality your car will almost always be faster with the rear wing at 3 degrees.